Great Lakes Water Levels – Some Good News

Bill's Blog

The above pic. is courtesy of Steve Damstra. Some good news. An overall dry pattern has brought Great Lakes water levels down a bit. Grand Rapids has had just 0.08″ of rain in the last 16 days (a trace in the last 11 days). We’ve also had a lot of sunshine (85% in the last 11 days).

Lake Superior is down 1″ in the last month and down 4″ in the last year. The lake is still 9″ above the September average and it’s 4″ below the record highest September average set last year.

Lake Michigan/Huron is down 4″ in the last month and it’s now at the same water level as one year ago. The lake is 30″ above the September average and is now 4″ below the September average highest level set in 1986.

Lake Erie is also down 4″ in the last month and is down 2″ from one year ago. The lake is 23″ higher than the highest average September level set one year ago.

Lake Ontario is down 9″ in the last month and down 15″ from one year ago. The lake is just 1″ above the September average level and is 25″ below the highest level ever set in 1947.

Lake St. Clair is down 4″ in the last month and unchanged from one year ago. The lake is 28″ higher than the average September level and 2″ below the record highest September water level set last year.

View of the Detroit River – from the Army Corps of Engineers

All the rivers that connect the Great Lakes continue to have well above average flow. The St. Mary’s River at S. Ste. Marie has a flow of 97,000 cubic feet per second. The Detroit River at Detroit has a flow of 253,000 cfs, compared an average flow of 194,000 cfs.

Most other rivers continue to have above average flow, despite the dry pattern over the past couple weeks. The Grand River at Grand Rapids has a flow of 1,990 cfs, compared to an average flow of 1,710 cfs. The Muskegon River at Croton has a flow of 1,230 cfs, compared to an average flow of 1,160 cfs. The Kalamazoo River at Comstock has a flow of 669 cfs, compared to an average flow of 595 cfs. The Saginaw River at Saginaw has a flow of 3,770 cfs, compared to an average flow of 1,470 cfs and the Fox River at Green Bay WI has a flow of 3,790 cfs, compared to an average flow of 2,220 cfs.

ALSO: Waterspouts possible on the Great Lakes during the week of Sept. 28-Oct. 4. At 5 am Sat. the temperature at Big Rapids was 56 and the wind was calm, while the temperature at Ludington was 70 with a SW wind at 15 mph, gusting to 22 mph.

GREAT LAKES NEWS: Win a trip aboard a freighter. Invasive sea lampreys. Shipments of Canadian grain through the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway are up 20 percent this year. Mussels have a story to tell. Fascinating history of shipwrecks. Fixing Lake Michigan bike trail could cost 10 Million Dollars. High beach attendance this summer (it was a sunny, warm summer). Wisconsin’s first Asian carp. Wolf population increases 13%. Walleye and perch fishing has been excellent this year.

I’ll add to this threat later today.

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