Great Lakes Water Levels, and Great Lakes News

Bill's Blog

With the exception of Lake Ontario, the Great Lakes are near or above record high water levels for the month of June. Lake Michigan/Huron will set a record for the highest average June water level and it’s a real concern that we can’t get the level down before the “gales of Noember” bring strong onshore winds and the threat of lakeshore flooding. (pic. above from Marie Steffen, aka daughter #2).

Graph of Great Lakes Water Levels

Lake Superior is up 4″ in the last month. So far this June, they’ve had double average rainfall at S. Ste. Marie and Marquette is 1.7″ above average for the month. However, Lake Superior is down 4 inches since June 2019. It’s still 11″ above the average June levle and 4″ below the record June average level set last year.

Lake Michigan/Huron is up 2″ in the last month and up 4″ year-to-year. The lakes are 35″ above the average June level and 5″ higher than the previous June average record level set in 1986.

Lake Erie is down 2″ in the last month and down 4″ in the last year. it’s still 28″ above the average June level and is now 3″ below the record highest average June level also set in 2019.

Lake Ontario is down 4″ in the last month and down a whopping 26″ in the last year. They have some very limited control over the level of Ontario. The lake is just 7″ higher than the average June level and is 26″ below the record high June level set last year.

Lake St. Clair is unchanged in the last month and unchanged from one year ago. The lake is 32″ above the average June level and is one inch above the highest June average level set in 2019.

Rockford Dam on the Rogue River

Most area rivers continue to have above average flow. The Grand River at Grand Rapids has a flow of 3,720 cubic feet per second, compared to an average flow of 2,550 cfs. The Kalamazoo River at Comstock has a flow of 1,650 cfs, compared to an average flow of 798 cfs. The St. Joseph River at Niles has a flow of 4,340 cfs, compared to an average flow of 2,930 cfs. The Muskegon River at Muskegon has a flow of 2,360 cfs, compared to an average of 1,680 cfs. The Saginaw River has a flow of 4,360 cfs, compared to an average flow of 3,070 cfs.

All the rivers that connect the Great Lakes continue to have well above average flow. Some good news, the flow on the St. Mary’s River, which moves water from Lake Superior into Lake Huron-Michigan is down to a flow of 88,000 cfs. It was up around 100,000 cfs. The St. Clair River at Port Huron has a flow of 250,000 cfs, compared to an average flow of 194,000 cfs.

Also: Mysterious floating island in Muskegon Lake. Check out Boatnerd. New no wake zones at Pigeon Lake and on Lake Macatawa.

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