Great Lakes Water Level Update (and News)

Bill's Blog

Above pic. shows the high water level, as waves come over the wall near Bay City, Michigan on Halloween. (pic. from the U.S. Coast Guard).

Lake Superior Water Level Graph

The water level of Lake Superior is down 1 inch in the last month, up 2″ in the last year and is now 15″ above the November average. The level is 2″ below the all-time record high level set in 1925.

Water Level Graph of Lake Michigan/Huron

The water level of Lake Michigan/Huron is is down 1″ in the last month. It’s 15″ higher than one year ago. The lakes are 35″ higher than the November average level. It’s still 4″ below the record November level set in 1986.

Water Level Graph of Lake Erie

The water level of Lake Erie is down 4″ in the last month and up 5″ in the last year. The level is 27″ higher than the November average level and 6″ lower than the record high November level also set in 1986.

Water Level Graph of Lake Ontario

The water level of Lake Ontario is unchanged over the last month. The lake is 18″ higher than one year ago and 21″ higher than the November average level. The lake is 4″ low than the record high level of 1945.

Graph of the Water Level of Lake St. Clair

The water level of Lake St. Clair is down 4″ in the last month. It’s 8″ higher than one year ago. The lake is 32″ higher than the November average, but it remains 4″ lower than the record high November level of 1986.

Soo Looks in Winter – pic. from Army Corps of Engineers

The rivers that connect the Great Lakes all have well above average flow. The St. Clair River at Port Huron has a current (early Sat. AM) flow of 256,000 cubic feet per second, compared to an average Nov. flow of 187,000.

Grand River at night in early Nov. – from Russell Sekeet

The Grand River in Grand Rapids has a flow of 10,400 cfs vs. an average flow of 2,430 cfs. The Kalamazoo River at Comstock has a flow of 1,520 cfs compared to an average of 754 cfs. The St. Joseph River at Niles has a flow of 5,760 dfs compared to an average flow of 2,380. The Muskegon River at Croton has a flow of 3,600 cfs compared to an average of 1,880. The Saginaw River at Saginaw has a flow of 9,070 cfs compared to an average flow of 2,790 cfs. The Fox River at Green Bay has a flow of 8,210 compared to an average flow of 4,390 cfs. These high water levels will continue to act to keep the Great Lakes wter levels high.

Article on lake levels here. The article says: “A 2019 climate change assessment for the Great Lakes conducted by the Environmental Law and Policy Center found that ‘the most recent research shows both the potential for drops and rises in lake levels into the future.’ ” Sounds like something from Captain Obvious…and my research assessment concluded that expectant parents will have the potential for both boys and girls in the future”. Here’s the long-term 100-year graph of the Great Lakes water levels:

100 year graph of Great Lakes water levels

The lake levels go up and down with precipitation being the biggest factor. The graphs appear unrelated to the steady increase in atmospheric CO2. There is likely some small increase in precipitation because man is putting more water vapor (that other more important, but often ignored greenhouse gas) into the air. Look how much of agriculture is irrigated…from our lawns to golf courses, we are putting more water vapor into the air…that’s the stuff precipitation is made of.

GREAT LAKES NEWS: 110-year old shipwreck discovered. Tomorrow – Nov. 10 is the anniversary of the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald. Record-breaking shipping season. Lake Superior misses all-time record high by 1.1 inches….translation: the lake isn’t as high as it was 34 years ago. Iron scow moves for first time in over 100 years.

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